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Duck Tales

Baseball Duck Tales – 2017 Season Wrap (NL)

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Amidst the Shohei Ohtani and Stanton madness (How exciting is this stuff?!) and basically nothing else (How boring is this stuff?), we continue our season wrap up of the 2017 Duck leaderboard, this time highlighting one standout Duck rating from the NL teams. As per usual for posterity, if you’re new to the series, the Duck is a combined calculation of a number of metrics to find an accessible representation of pitching performance. Check out the origins of the calculations here.

For reference, here are the 2017 league averages for starters according to Fangraphs:

  • SwStr%: 9.80%
  • K%: 20.60%
  • BABIP: 0.299
  • BB%: 8.10%
  • xFIP: 4.41
  • HardCon%: 32.30%
  • ERA: 4.49
  • WHIP: 1.36

Let’s take a look at some standout Ducks from the NL this year.

NL East

  • ATL: Julio Teheran (109th)
    • Was it really going to be anyone else? Teheran went from a very rock solid and safe top-25ish guy to doing almost nothing above league average. Part of it “could” be the new ballpark, but we don’t have nearly the data to confirm the ballpark will trend to a hitter’s haven. On top of that, Teheran’s BABIP hints that he might have even been a little lucky on balls in play. I’m not against him in general but there’s more downside than upside at this point.
  • MIA: Dan Straily (54th)
    • I like Dan Straily. There, I said it. I just feel that the range of outcomes is not very wide for him. He’s a boring pitcher, but eating innings is important throughout the fantasy season. One of the arguments against him: “But he plays for a garbage team so he won’t get wins!” My response: “Don’t use wins.”
  • NYM: Matt Harvey (147th)
    • I’m very sad. I just want Matt Harvey to be good again. I just want to believe that the injuries and the Adriana Lima debacle made him suck. I just want to be happy. Maybe the fear about returning from thoracic outlet surgery and never being the same is valid (despite the limited cases studies we have. I’m not a doctor.). I think if he looks at least goodish coming into the season, I’ll take the plunge one more time. Feel free to join me but I don’t want to take responsibility if we drown.
  • PHI: Aaron Nola (20th)
    • Aaron Nola is a star. There’s talk of him comfortably in the top 20 going into next season and the Duck doesn’t have issue with that. He’s another one of those “all green” players on the metric, and I don’t have nearly the same injury concerns that I have with the other all green mentioned in the last article (James Paxton). I’m happy with Nola as my SP2 or SP3 in 2018
  • WSH: Gio Gonzalez (93rd)
    • Obviously. This season-long excellence pretty much came as a pretty big surprise. Gio Gonzalez has been on the spectrum from “he’s a fine pitcher” to “oh, that was actually a pretty good season” for a long time. This was a step even further above that and I think it’s well established that we don’t expect something like this again. Still, there’s going to continue to be mid-round value that shouldn’t be ignored.

NL Central

  • CIN: Luis Castillo (29th)
    • Castillo is the new darling in many expert circles. He’s a little wild, but the strikeouts are very tantalizing. He’s going to be right there in the top 30 range for a lot of rankers, but I’m definitely wary of repeatable performance. I just don’t like the idea of taking him as a shiny new toy over someone like Jon Lester who has a track record of solid production for years.
  • CHC: Jon Lester (30th)
    • Speaking of Jon Lester… by all intents and purposes Jon Lester had a bad season. A 4.33 ERA is unheard of for Lester in recent memory. Still, the underlying numbers think he’s way better than advertised (another all green) and while I’m not a Lester guy (it’s mostly just his face, really) there are a plethora of worse options.
  • MIL: Jimmy Nelson (13th)
    • We need the DH in both leagues. It’s just a shame that Jimmy Nelson is going to miss half the season with a base running injury. After a few seasons of will he/won’t he become a guy, this last season he actually did become a guy, and that guy played a pivotal role in getting the Brewers to an unprecedented playoff berth. I can’t help but think it could have been a different story if both Nelson and Chase Anderson had been healthy. Still, there’s a chance Nelson is priced down significantly because of the injury, and could be a sneaky later round pick.
  • PIT: Gerrit Cole (35th)
    • Let me preface this: I think Gerrit Cole is good. I think he could still be great. But I would be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge that the numbers to this point have been disappointing. Someone who can dial it up to 98+ should theoretically be able to blow hitters away and he hasn’t shown that ability consistently. I wonder if this could be a change of scenery case. There have been talks of Cole to the Twins, and if that happens, I might just push him up my board a bit as a speculative upside play. We’ve seen it before, there’s no reason to think he couldn’t be a sub-3 ERA guy again.
  • STL: Lance Lynn (125th)
    • Lynn is going to be on another team next year, who will be looking for a stable 200 inning guy in the middle of their rotation to eat up innings in the dog days of the summer. I’ll note that Lynn hasn’t gotten to 200 innings in three seasons, but the idea is valid. I kind of think the Duck falls a bit short on this measure. The rating thinks he is far below average given the metrics, but I just feel like Lynn is a valuable middle rotation MLB piece and a valuable back end rotation fantasy piece and there’s just not a ton of questions there.

NL West

  • ARI: Zack Godley (24th)
    • We love Zack Godley. He’s just a fun player. Being able to keep the ball on the ground as he does is a great boon in that ballpark and ties in well with surprisingly high strikeout numbers. I feel as though he’ll be a little undervalued at the draft table, but I don’t see a lot of reasons he’s not going to be some shade of 2017 again.
  • COL: Jon Gray (22nd)
    • If he was on any other team, Jon Gray would be considered a true ace, a top-15ish starter, and someone you were okay with as your SP1.5 in fantasy. I’m very pro Gray and I think he’s the guy who will be the first pitcher to overcome Coors since Ubaldo Jimenez back in 2010. I dream of an ERA under 3.30.
  • LAD: Alex Wood (19th)
    • I bought into Wood after his first lengthy campaign in Atlanta in 2014, and it obviously didn’t play out as expected and I didn’t initially pay much mind to him putting together what ended up being an amazing season as a whole this season. The injury was there because of course we can’t have nice things. He faded down the stretch and that is some cause for concern but anywhere between 3.20 and 3.40 in 2018 would be a great follow-up season.
  • SD: Dinelson Lamet (77th)
    • Lamet is the epitome of risky flamethrower. The stuff is there, the consistency and the control are just not. An alarmingly high hard contact rate shows that if he wasn’t fanning or walking the hitters, he was turning around to watch the ball fly past him into the outfield. He seems like a big high risk/high reward play next season.
  • SF: Johnny Cueto (73rd)
    • There has been a lot of panic about Cueto and the fact that he had objectively an awful season. I guess I’m just not that worried. Just like Lester, this track record he’s shown matters. In a very early mock I was involved in, Cueto was available well into the mid-100 pick range, and I just think that’s silly. No one would be surprised if Cueto can get back to a low 3 ERA, especially in that home ballpark, and I would be drafting him pretty close to Lester as a proven commodity and take the fall if they’ve really gone off a cliff.

That’s a wrap of our brief look through the inaugural season of the Duck rating. I expect that we’ll check in before the season and preview the major pitcher signings and their outlooks in the upcoming season, so stay tuned!

All statistics pulled from Fangraphs leaderboards.

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Duck Tales

Baseball Duck Tales – 2017 Season Wrap Part 1 (AL)

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After a great World Series and some time off of baseball, we’re back to… talk about baseball. Today I want to take a end-of-season look at our 2017 Duck leaderboard. The final leaderboard serves as our retrospective for all pitchers for the 2017 season, and a potential way to look under the surface and see if anything we see here can serve as a predictive primer for future performance.  As per usual for posterity if you’re just finding this series, the Duck rating is a formulaic way to look at important pitching metrics and dig a little deeper underneath the surface statistics that we are generally most privy to as fans. To find how we calculate the Duck, check our original introduction here. Another side note: The 80 IP minimum used in our calculations are as a starter, so it doesn’t account for any relief appearances.

For reference, here are the 2017 league averages for starters according to Fangraphs:

  • SwStr%: 9.80%
  • K%: 20.60%
  • BABIP: 0.299
  • BB%: 8.10%
  • xFIP: 4.41
  • HardCon%: 32.30%
  • ERA: 4.49
  • WHIP: 1.36

This 2017 Wrap will be the first of a two part series in which we’ll take a quick scan of one interesting Duck rating from each team in the league, starting with the American League.

AL East

  • BAL: Dylan Bundy (79th)
    • What a hot and cold season for Bundy. Started the season with some dominant starts, but he really tailed off and became just a solid back end fantasy starter. He never ended up taking that step forward that we’ve been waiting for since he was drafted. Maybe that step just doesn’t come. The strikeouts aren’t really where we want them to be (152 in 169.2 IP). I think he’s fine, but maybe he’s just that.
  • BOS: Drew Pomeranz (70th)
    • Pomeranz is such an interesting case. At first glance, it’s hard to complain about the ERA in this environment. The Duck tells us that we should be wary though. The high WHIP and high strand rate seems like a ticking time bomb in that ballpark.
  • NYY: Masahiro Tanaka (7th)
    • The talk is all about Luis Severino in New York, and for good reason, but we’ve talked about Tanaka before in this series. He’s the poster child of a good pitcher who had a bad season. The home runs were THE problem, and that shows how volatile pitching is. Tanaka was above average on the positive end for every metric involved in the Duck, and ERA was the only outlier. He’s sticking around in New York, and I wouldn’t be surprised if he has a better ERA/WHIP combo than Severino in 2018.
  • TB: Alex Cobb (112th)
    • I’ve historically been a fan of Alex Cobb. Before his run-in with the injury bug, he was in conversation as an elite pitcher. I just don’t think the upside to be much better than the 3.66 ERA is there. A 4.24 xFIP is okay, but not sexy. The strikeouts have never been sexy at the major league level, and a K/9 below 7.00 is hard to swallow.
  • TOR: Marcus Stroman (45th)
    • Stroman is the enemy of the Duck. His money is obviously made with an amazing groundball rate, and that’s not a contributor to our metric here. He’s one of the kings of “pretty good” at everything, and that just puts him at a high floor SP3 who pairs with an elite K flamethrower. That’s been the Stroman story for a few years and that’s as safe a bet as we can make for any pitcher going forward.

AL Central

  • CLE: Mike Clevinger (71st)
    • I just want to start out by saying that the Indians had four pitchers in the top 20 of our season-ending leaderboard. That’s just insane (It’s almost like they had one of the best pitching staffs ever.). But I really want to bring up Clevinger. He falls just behind Pomeranz on the leaderboard, but he’s easily the more exciting pitcher. It’s hard understand why he carried a sub-3 ERA across 120+ innings, with limited control and more loud contact than desired, but a 3.50/1.25 pitcher with good strikeouts going forward is definitely useful.
  • CWS: James Shields (124th)
    • I didn’t have a lot of options here since they traded everything that breathed and at the end of the season the only requirement to pitch for the squad was to have all limbs attached and live within a 25 mile radius of the ballpark. PSA: don’t draft James Shields.
  • DET: Anibal Sanchez (28th)
    • That is not a typo. The Duck likes the fact that he didn’t give up many free passes, and feels he was more unlucky than anything with a serviceable 4.18 xFIP and a ballooned BABIP. I don’t know how actionable this is, since he’s not actually with the team anymore at this point. Maybe keep an eye if he goes somewhere favorable and accidentally runs into a few decent starts.
  • KC: Jakob Junis (82nd)
    • I’m secretly a fan of Jake Junis, since he was pivotal to some deep playoff runs for me this season in fantasy. Really though, I just don’t think he’s special. Anyone that can pitch to a 4ish ERA will be fantasy relevant, and he should be on radars and maybe even drafted late in some very deep leagues, but he’s going to be passed around like a bottle of crown in most leagues (+10 for anyone who gets that reference).
  • MIN: Ervin Santana (83rd)
    • The Twins surprise duck would obviously be Ervin Santana. I want to play a little devil’s advocate here. The only thing that eventually matters is the final numbers, and Santana found a way to overcome some glaring flaws to put up the season line that he did. Obviously, regression is in the cards, and probably in a big way, but maybe that regression isn’t to a 4.50 ERA but closer to a 3.85 which, again, is very helpful in this environment.

AL West

  • HOU: Charlie Morton (23rd)
    • How cool is it that Charlie Morton was a thing? How cool is it that he clinched the first World Series for that team? He’s been aggressively “meh” for so long and he put together just a fantastic season. This isn’t too different a case than Danny Duffy in some ways, where Morton finds another gear and turns up the gas on his pitches and sees some success. All that being said, just like Duffy had struggles losing velocity and passing out in Burger King drive-thrus, Morton could see some of the same, but hopefully he’ll have some respectability to at least get to Whataburger instead.
  • LAA: Parker Bridwell (119th)
    • Don’t draft Parker Bridwell. Literally nothing about this can go that well. In the best case scenario he doesn’t obliterate your ratios on a weekly basis.
  • OAK: Jharel Cotton (122nd)
    • I’m just sad about this. I was really interested in Cotton going into this last season after he flashed some promise in late 2016. The ballpark in Oakland seemed tailor-made for someone with Cotton’s arsenal, but it just didn’t come to fruition. I’ll definitely be eyeing him coming into next season. He’s someone where how he looks in Spring Training might actually matter to see if he sticks in the rotation in the future.
  • SEA: James Paxton (11th)
    • We love James Paxton. He’s just fun. He’s one of just 11 pitchers who is “green” across every metric on the leaderboard, meaning he’s trending positively in every metric in the rating. The big question mark for Paxton remains the health piece. The stuff is there, the amazing nickname is there, now we just wait for 200 innings of electric performances.
  • TEX: Andrew Cashner (150th)
    • Fun fact: there are 153 pitchers on the Duck leaderboard with at least 80 starters innings pitched. To find someone with a better ERA than Cashner on the season, we have to move up 57 spots (Gio Gonzalez. We’ll probably discuss him soon.). Another fun fact: Cashner sucks. Just don’t.

Stay tuned for part 2 of our End-of-season Duckdate soon!

 

All statistics pulled from Fangraphs leaderboards.

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Duck Tales

Baseball Duck Tales – September 2017 Edition

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We are baaaacckkkk! Welcome to what will be the last in-season edition of the Baseball Duck Tales, and then we’ll follow that up with a season recap in October once the playoffs are underway. The Duck rating was originally derived as a hopefully accessible way to look underneath pitcher ERA which lies to us on a regular basis because it doesn’t account for the little bloop hits that probably should have been caught but then got mishandled and allowed two runs. We boiled down some commonly used diagnostic metrics to rank pitchers based on just one number. Again, I won’t go through the nitty-gritty again, so check that out here.

Before I put the updated leaderboard below, I do want to clear up that the leaderboard looks at ONLY pitchers who have thrown 80+ innings over the course of the ENTIRE season to date. It is not broken down by month. So, this is not how this pitcher has fared in the month of August, but rather how they have fared throughout the season, and their rank is compared to their August rank (Change column). One month of five or six starts is just too small of a sample size to glean anything actionable, so it’s best to look at progression rather than just small chunks of starts as separate entities in this exercise. Also, the Change column does need to be taken with a slight grain of salt, because ingrained into that is also change from new pitchers hitting 80 innings pitched sometime during the month of August, so pitchers on the extreme end of change may be more interesting.

Here are the league averages used to calculate the current Duck ratings:

  • SwStr%: 9.70%
  • K%: 20.50%
  • BABIP: 0.298
  • BB%: 8.10%
  • xFIP: 4.42
  • HardCon%: 32.40%
  • ERA: 4.49
  • WHIP: 1.36

Last month I said every edition would look at some highlights and lowlights of the rating to point out some pitchers performing above and below their value. Well, I lied, because this is my column and I can do what I want, this month I wanted to look at some pitchers who just reached the 80 IP threshold within the last calendar month and provide some general thoughts on their season and whether they should be trusted down the stretch. My instinct says to call them “Baby Ducks” which seems weird but now I’m committed to it.

Baby Ducks

  • Danny Salazar (5th): 5th! For all intents and purposes, kind of a lost year for Salazar owners, but it definitely wasn’t for lack of trying. The high WHIP and the mediocre ERA has driven people crazy, but if we’re looking at it objectively, it’s not nearly as tough of a pill to swallow in this environment given he strikes so many batters out. The injury issue is definitely more prevalent, but if Salazar is coming back next week as reported, I would be excited by his prospects in the stretch run.
  • Brad Peacock (23rd): Brad Peacock is fun. Tantalizing strikeouts and a walk issue (sound familiar? Look at the name above.) He seems to have figured out how to go a bit deeper into games, which is great for fantasy value (win/QS potential) but there definitely is the concern about what happens when all the pieces are healthy and pitching in Houston, with Verlander coming into town and McCullers potentially returning within the next week or two, but here’s to hoping Mike Fiers is the first man to the pen, and not Peacock, even though Peacock’s electric stuff might be best in high leverage situations.
  • Jameson Taillon (51st): I’m a fan of Jameson Taillon. He’s definitely one the best stories of this baseball season (Chad Bettis comeback is right there too.). I just think his skillset is a little limited from a fantasy angle. He’s not really a bat-misser and if the walks aren’t in control, he runs into some trouble. 51st on the leaerboard isn’t BAD by any stretch of the imagination, he’s an above average pitcher and quite good as a mid-rotation asset for an MLB team. I think he’s generally solid, but as we’ve seen with guys like Dallas Keuchel and Sonny Gray, the margin for error for pitchers of that ilk is not very big.
  • Parker Bridwell (89th): Run. This can’t end well. The swinging strike rate is bad. The strikeout rate is bad. He’s getting lucky. The hard hit rate is bad. He’s been useful for a stretch here but depending on him in the fantasy playoffs is a recipe for disaster. 14+ team depth is probably a hold at this point, but I’d be nervous about him even in good matchups (see vs OAK, August 30th)
  • Cole Hamels (130th): What a fall from grace. I highlighted him in the 2016 review as someone who was iffy despite pretty good numbers and a Cy-young caliber season before the last few starts derailed that hope. Well, as of today, Hamels is 130th out of 136 qualifiers on the 2017 Duck leaderboard. Update: that’s really bad. Literally none of the numbers this season say he can maintain the 3.30 ERA. It’s sad to see declines like this, but he’s not the only older pitcher we’ve seen a dramatic decline from. Felix has been trending this direction, Lackey has basically hung up the laces to fight people in the Wrigley field parking lot, James Shields hasn’t been the same since Bartolomas (observed on May 7th). My instinct tells me that Hamels will grit out another season or two of relevance, but I wouldn’t put money on it.

That’s everything from our September Duckdate. We’ll be back in October for a season-in-review and final leaderboard update.

 

All statistics pulled from Fangraphs leaderboards.

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Duck Tales

Baseball Duck Tales – August 2017 Edition

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We’re back with the first installment of our 2017 Duck Tales series! The plan is to update the Duck rating leaderboard every two weeks, and then do a season-long wrap-up when we start dissecting the season in post-mortem. I won’t rehash how the Duck rating is derived here, so for a rundown of how the metric was born, view our introdution and 2016 review here.

As with the 2016 leaderboard, we only looked at pitchers who have thrown at least 80 innings so far in 2017. Without further ado, our 2017 Duck leaderboard as of August 1st, 2017!

Here are the league averages used to calculate the current Duck ratings:

  • SwStr%: 9.80%
  • K%: 20.50%
  • BABIP: 0.298
  • BB%: 8.10%
  • xFIP: 4.41
  • HardCon%: 32.50%
  • ERA: 4.49
  • WHIP: 1.35

Every edition of Duck Tales will come with some “Mighty Ducks” and “Wimpy Ducks” that the metric highlights as players who may be above or below their perceived value.

Mighty Ducks

  • Jeff Samardzija (3rd): Shark is one of the cases where the Duck gives us a questionable result. A 4.85 ERA is obviously not ideal, and no one is valuing Samardzija as a great pitcher, but a couple things do stand out. Firstly, the 4.85 ERA doesn’t match a 1.18 WHIP. He’s getting beaten handily by his xFIP (1.67 difference) and is actually above the league average in every one of our underlying metrics. The high magnitude of the actual Duck value is driven by an astronomically low walk rate (much like Kershaw’s was driven up miles ahead of everyone else in 2016 with a 2.00% walk rate.)
  • Masahiro Tanaka (7th): On the far end of the spectrum is Masahiro Tanaka. On the surface, most everything about Tanaka has screamed “SUCK” all season, but the Duck seems to think otherwise. The ONLY “bad” statistic in Tanaka’s numbers is that obnoxious ERA mainly populated by early disastrous outings. Tanaka has been pretty rock solid for some time now, and if the buying window hasn’t already closed, I would say go buy now.
  • Zack Godley (16th): One of the original iterations of our Duck rating included groundball rate, which is Godley’s major calling card and the supposed key to his success. It turns out that despite the removal of GB% in this version of the Duck, he only drops from 14th to this perch at 16th. Many people smarter than me have been touting Godley as a bona fide fantasy starter, and it’s hard to argue it.
  • Josh Tomlin (19th): I have to address this as a minor flaw in the metric, similar to what we saw driving Samardzija’s rating up. Tomlin’s walk rate (2.60%) is the lowest on the board, but Tomlin just might be baseball’s biggest anomaly in general. No numbers can fathom that someone with this much control can give up this much hard contact and this many home runs.
  • Sonny Gray (20th): Let’s go back to Yankees corner and check in with the newest Yankee, Sonny Gray. There has been a big debate among folks at ITL about Sonny Gray vs Gerrit Cole (also making an appearance on the most recent ITL baseball podcast). Well, Gray sits here at 20th in Duck, with Cole sitting at 32nd, so our metric says Gray is the way. I expect Sonny to at worst hold value, as a ground-ball pitcher he may not struggle with home run tendencies of Yankee stadium, and anything is better than Oakland’s defense.
  • Tanner Roark (48th): Maybe it isn’t all doom and gloom for Roark, despite what has appeared a VERY bad season on the surface. Roark has been a poster child of “How is this happening?” in the last few years, and I think this is the “What happens when it’s not actually happening” version. I don’t think he ever goes back to a sub-3 ERA, but it’s hard to imagine he’ll continue to sit this close to 5. He’s definitely at least on my watch list. Also, he went to a great school. 🙂

 

Wimpy Ducks

  • Yu Darvish (28th): Fun fact: Trevor Bauer has a lower xFIP (3.73) than Yu Darvish (3.82). That is not a typo. This is an example of where the metrics don’t mean EVERYTHING, but they have to mean SOMETHING. Darvish is really having a season not so dissimilar to Chris Archer last season, and I just think that needs to be noted. The strikeouts are there, maybe he deserves better, but it’s just not really getting that much better. Of course, there’s also the wrinkle of playing for going to the NL and also playing for the best team in the NL. Not a panic button move, but just something to monitor. Since the creation of the Duck metric, Darvish got lit against Miami and then traded. Stay tuned for the next step in the saga.
  • Jake Arrieta (41st): Maybe this is just what we need to expect at this point from Arrieta. The ERA is sitting around 4 and most of these numbers are, well, just fine. BABIP says he’s actually getting a little lucky, he’s doing a solid job limiting hard contact but isn’t drawing swings. At this point, Arrieta might just be a solid, if unspectacular starter. I don’t think we’ll see crashing and burning, but there likely isn’t much more than name value here on the market.
  • Robbie Ray (50th): This is a little sad to me as a big proponent of Robbie Ray in the preseason. He’s above average in this environment, especially with that electric strikeout rate, but it’s VERY hard to maintain top value putting that many people on base AND giving up so much hard contact, especially in a hitter’s park.
  • Johnny Cueto (56th): Cueto’s downfall doesn’t make complete sense. I find it hard to fathom that he sucks now because of blistergate. The walks are up, the hard contact is up, but this is also a guy who hasn’t had an ERA this high since 2008. In an era where all our pitchers are dead, I can’t quit Cueto. My heart says not to quit, but the Duck doesn’t agree.
  • Gio Gonzalez (70th): Another pitcher who inspired the birth of the Duck, coming off his best start, we again revisit how this could be happening. It almost doesn’t make sense. He’s giving up more hard contact than his career dictates, more home runs, and there’s no tangible change in strikeout rates or walk rates (which are almost worse). The BABIP is the only thing that is markedly different (.241 compared to .293 career and .298 league average), but it’s just weird to see a guy have this extreme of a BABIP-fueled rebirth and sit at almost a full run below his career ERA (3.64). I’d be selling aggressively off of the near no-hitter.
  • Justin Verlander (78th): He had to be on the list, right? This is another guy I have such a hard time quitting. Normally, I trust numbers and analytics, but I think it’s always important to remember that we’re not living a simulation. These games happen live and involve real people, and there’s something to be said about being a professional pitcher and having a track record as consistently strong as Verlander’s. He’s thrown more pitches than anyone in baseball this season and right now it’s almost equally important to be durable and reliable.

Revisit us in a couple weeks for another Duckdate.

All statistics pulled from Fangraphs leaderboards.

 

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